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Woman finds cow lip in tacos

A Texas woman found what she thought were teeth in barbacoa tacos ordered at El Rincon, a restaurant in Pflugerville.

According to San Antonio’s KENS, Courtney Aguilar took to Facebook to share a picture of the tacos, saying, “When you order barbacoa tacos, but get teeth instead.”

Aguilar wrote that she asked a restaurant server if she was seeing teeth in her food, and the server responded, “baby teeth.”

What she was seeing was actually cow lips.

>> Read more trending news

The restaurant responded to Aguilar’s claim on Facebook, saying they get their barbacoa from a vendor. The vendor in turn responded clarifying that what the woman saw was actually cow lips.

“Barbacoa is one the few items that we buy pre-made from an approved FDA vendor, and we are no longer going to buy from that vendor,” the post reads. “Barbacoa is cooked with different parts of the cow, but mostly from the head or cheek of cattle. El Rincon will stop selling barbacoa until we get a new vendor.”

“The reality is this: Barbacoa is a rough business. It starts with a whole skinned cow’s head, wrapped in burlap and baling wire and buried in a smoking hole in the ground overnight,” the San Antonio Express News’ food writer Mike Sutter wrote. “In the morning, somebody with a sledgehammer opens up that skull and the harvesting begins: all the fatty and lean soft tissue from lip to crown. Sometimes the brains, sometimes the eyes, sometimes the tongue if it’s not being held out for lengua.”

House Leaders ‘Came Up Short’ In Effort To Kill Obamacare

Despite days of intense negotiations and last-minute concessions to win over wavering GOP conservatives and moderates, House Republican leaders Friday failed to secure enough support to pass their plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.

House Speaker Paul Ryan pulled the bill from consideration after he rushed to the White House to tell President Donald Trump that there weren’t the 216 votes necessary for passage.

“We came really close today, but we came up short,” he told reporters at a hastily called news conference.

When pressed about what happens to the federal health law, he added, “We’re going to be living with Obamacare for the foreseeable future.”

Ryan originally had hoped to hold a floor vote on the measure Thursday — timed to coincide with the seventh anniversary of the ACA — but decided to delay that effort because GOP leaders didn’t have enough “yes” votes. The House had been in session Friday while members debated parts of the bill.

The legislation was damaged by a variety of issues raised by competing factions of the party. Many members were spooked by reports by the Congressional Budget Office showing that the bill would lead eventually to 24 million people losing insurance, while some moderate Republicans worried that ending the ACA’s Medicaid expansion would hurt low-income Americans.

At the same time, conservatives, especially the hard-right House Freedom Caucus that often has needled party leaders, complained that the bill kept too much of the ACA structure in place. They wanted a straight repeal of Obamacare, but party leaders said that couldn’t pass the Senate, where Republicans don’t have enough votes to stop a filibuster. So they chose to use a complicated legislative strategy called budget reconciliation that would allow them to repeal only parts of the ACA that affect federal spending.

The decision came after a chaotic week of negotiations, as party leaders sought to woo more conservatives. Trump personally lobbied 120 members through personal meetings or phone calls, according to a count provided Friday by his spokesman, Sean Spicer. “The president and the team here have left everything on the field,” Spicer said.

On Thursday evening, Trump dispatched Office of Management and Development Director Mick Mulvaney to tell his former House GOP colleagues that the president wanted a vote on Friday. It was time to move on to other priorities, including tax reform, he told House Republicans.

“He said the president needs this, the president has said he wants a vote tomorrow, up or down. If for any reason it goes down, we’re just going to move forward with additional parts of his agenda. This is our moment in time,” Rep. Chris Collins (R-N.Y.), a loyal Trump ally, told reporters late Thursday. “If it doesn’t pass, we’re moving beyond health care. … We are done negotiating.”

Trump’s edict clearly irked some lawmakers, including the Freedom Caucus chairman, Rep. Mark Meadows (R-N.C), whose group of more than two dozen members represented the strongest bloc against the measure.

“Anytime you don’t have 216 votes, negotiations are not totally over,” he told reporters who had surrounded him in a Capitol basement hallway as he headed in to the party’s caucus meeting.

Shortly before Ryan’s press conference, Trump called Washington Post reporter Robert Costa to say they were pulling the bill back from consideration. Costa said the president seemed at ease with the decision and did not blame Ryan for the defeat.

Trump, Ryan and other GOP lawmakers tweaked their initial package in a variety of ways to win over both conservatives and moderates. But every time one change was made to win votes in one camp, it repelled support in another.

The White House on Thursday accepted conservatives’ demands that the legislation strip federal guarantees of essential health benefits in insurance policies. But that was another problem for moderates, and Democrats suggested the provision would not survive in the Senate.

Republican moderates in the House — as well as the Senate — objected to the bill’s provisions that would shift Medicaid from an open-ended entitlement to a set amount of funding for states that would also give governors and state lawmakers more flexibility over the program. Moderates also were concerned that the package’s tax credits would not be generous enough to help older Americans — who could be charged five times more for coverage than their younger counterparts — afford coverage.

The House package also lost the support of key GOP allies, including the Club for Growth and Heritage Action. Physician, patient and hospital groups also opposed it.

It’s not clear what will happen next to the Republican effort to overturn or modify Obamacare. But White House officials told members Thursday that if they couldn’t pass the legislation, the president wanted to turn to other priorities, including tax reform. “The president understands this is it,” Spicer said. “We had this opportunity to — to change the trajectory of health care, to help improve — put a health care system in place and to end the nightmare that Republicans have campaigned on called Obamacare.”

Not A Done Deal: House Leaders ‘Came Up Short’ In Effort To Kill Obamacare

Despite days of intense negotiations and last-minute concessions to win over wavering GOP conservatives and moderates, House Republican leaders Friday failed to secure enough support to pass their plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.

House Speaker Paul Ryan pulled the bill from consideration after he rushed to the White House to tell President Donald Trump that there weren’t the 216 votes necessary for passage.

“We came really close today, but we came up short,” he told reporters at a hastily called news conference.

When pressed about what happens to the federal health law, he added, “We’re going to be living with Obamacare for the foreseeable future.”

Ryan originally had hoped to hold a floor vote on the measure Thursday — timed to coincide with the seventh anniversary of the ACA — but decided to delay that effort because GOP leaders didn’t have enough “yes” votes. The House had been in session Friday while members debated parts of the bill.

The legislation was damaged by a variety of issues raised by competing factions of the party. Many members were spooked by reports by the Congressional Budget Office showing that the bill would lead eventually to 24 million people losing insurance, while some moderate Republicans worried that ending the ACA’s Medicaid expansion would hurt low-income Americans.

At the same time, conservatives, especially the hard-right House Freedom Caucus that often has needled party leaders, complained that the bill kept too much of the ACA structure in place. They wanted a straight repeal of Obamacare, but party leaders said that couldn’t pass the Senate, where Republicans don’t have enough votes to stop a filibuster. So they chose to use a complicated legislative strategy called budget reconciliation that would allow them to repeal only parts of the ACA that affect federal spending.

The decision came after a chaotic week of negotiations, as party leaders sought to woo more conservatives. Trump personally lobbied 120 members through personal meetings or phone calls, according to a count provided Friday by his spokesman, Sean Spicer. “The president and the team here have left everything on the field,” Spicer said.

On Thursday evening, Trump dispatched Office of Management and Development Director Mick Mulvaney to tell his former House GOP colleagues that the president wanted a vote on Friday. It was time to move on to other priorities, including tax reform, he told House Republicans.

“He said the president needs this, the president has said he wants a vote tomorrow, up or down. If for any reason it goes down, we’re just going to move forward with additional parts of his agenda. This is our moment in time,” said Rep. Chris Collins (R-N.Y.), a loyal Trump ally, told reporters late Thursday. “If it doesn’t pass, we’re moving beyond health care. … We are done negotiating.”

Trump’s edict clearly irked some lawmakers, including the Freedom Caucus chairman, Rep. Mark Meadows (R-N.C), whose group of more than two dozen members represented the strongest bloc against the measure.

“Anytime you don’t have 216 votes, negotiations are not totally over,” he told reporters who had surrounded him in a Capitol basement hallway as he headed in to the party’s caucus meeting.

Shortly before Ryan’s press conference, Trump called Washington Post reporter Robert Costa to say they were pulling the bill back from consideration. Costa said the president seemed at ease with the decision and did not blame Ryan for the defeat.

Trump, Ryan and other GOP lawmakers tweaked their initial package in a variety of ways to win over both conservatives and moderates. But every time one change was made to win votes in one camp, it repelled support in another.

The White House on Thursday accepted conservatives’ demands that the legislation strip federal guarantees of essential health benefits in insurance policies. But that was another problem for moderates and Democrats suggested the provision would not survive in the Senate.

Republican moderates in the House — as well as the Senate — objected to the bill’s provisions that would shift Medicaid from an open-ended entitlement to a set amount of funding for states that would also give governors and state lawmakers more flexibility over the program.  Moderates also were concerned that the package’s tax credits would not be generous enough to help older Americans — who could be charged five times more for coverage than their younger counterparts — afford coverage.

The House package also lost the support of key GOP allies, including the Club for Growth and Heritage Action. Physician, patient and hospital groups also opposed it.

It’s not clear what will happen next to the Republican effort to overturn or modify Obamacare. But White House officials told members Thursday that if they couldn’t pass the legislation, the president wanted to turn to other priorities, including tax reform. “The president understands this is it,” Spicer said. “We had this opportunity to — to change the trajectory of health care, to help improve — put a health care system in place and to end the nightmare that Republicans have campaigned on called Obamacare.”

Kaiser Health News (KHN) is a national health policy news service. It is an editorially independent program of the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation.

Not A Done Deal: Ryan Pulls Back Bill To Replace Obamacare

Despite days of intense negotiations and last-minute concessions to win over wavering GOP conservatives and moderates, House Republican leaders Friday failed to win enough support to pass their plan to partially repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.

House Speaker Paul Ryan made the announcement at the Capitol after rushing to the White House to meet with President Donald Trump. The decision came after a fluid 24 hours of negotiation among Republican leaders and different factions of the party. The leadership had hoped to have a vote on their bill Thursday but put that off after it was clear they didn’t have enough “yes” votes. Trump issued an ultimatum to House members Thursday night, saying he was done with concessions and they needed to vote Friday to get the legislation moving. But the gambit did not change enough votes to push the bill through the House.

Story is developing. Check back here for more details shortly.

Insurers May Notch Bigger Profits From Fewer Customers In ‘Trumpcare’

The House GOP’s embattled health care bill has plenty of detractors: Democrats, hospitals, the American Medical Association and the House Freedom Caucus all oppose it. But the insurance industry is not on that list — even though it stands to lose millions of customers.

One reason the industry has been hanging back: Insurers’ profits are expected to fatten under the bill.

The House Republicans’ replacement plan would likely attract more younger, healthier consumers to the individual market than the Affordable Care Act did, according to Standard & Poor’s, the corporate credit rating firm. The ACA tilted the opposite way, offering more options for older, sicker Americans whose health care claims eroded insurers’ profits.

“Profitability will likely improve, as the replacement plan can result in an improved risk pool in the individual market,” S&P said in a report on the House leadership’s initial plan.

A vote on the GOP “Trumpcare” bill is expected Friday, but by late Thursday it remained unclear whether there were enough votes to pass it. The Trump administration has said if the measure doesn’t pass Friday, it will abandon the effort to replace Obamacare.

Under the current health law, an insurer is allowed to charge a 64-year-old consumer a premium that’s three times what it charges a 21-year-old. The House bill allows insurers to charge older consumers premiums that are five times higher.

That change would reduce premiums for younger consumers but boost them significantly for people in their 50s and 60s – even with tax credits that increase for older people under the GOP plan.

Not all insurers are enthusiastic about what’s in the House bill. Those that are also mainly in the business of managing Medicaid services to enrollees under contract with states — such as Molina Healthcare — oppose the bill because of the expected sharp reductions in Medicaid if the House measure is enacted.

In a new analysis of the House bill that was released Thursday, the Congressional Budget Office predicted 9 million people would fall off Medicaid rolls by 2020 and 14 million by 2026. Overall, 52 million Americans under 65 would be uninsured by 2026 compared with 28 million that year under current law, the CBO said.

America’s Health Insurance Plans (AHIP), which has expressed concerns about the bill but hasn’t taken a formal position for or against the bill, has said the legislation’s provisions would give short-term relief to insurers that have been mostly losing money since the exchanges started in 2014.

Those include giving states $100 billion over 10 years to start high-risk pools and stabilization funds to help insurers deal with higher-risk customers.

One of the most significant positives for insurers in the GOP bill is the elimination of a tax that all insurers paid under the ACA. The industry paid $8 billion in 2014 and is expected to pay $14.3 billion in 2018. Congress temporarily suspended the fee for this year.

Insurers’ opposition to the tax was one of the main reasons why the insurance industry chose not to support the ACA when it was approved in 2010. However, the insurance industry built support for the law by throwing its weight behind a requirement preventing insurers from refusing coverage to consumers with preexisting conditions in exchange for a mandate that most Americans have health coverage.

Although many conservative Republicans favor ending the individual mandate, the GOP bill as originally proposed would instead require that Americans keep continuous health coverage or pay a 30 percent penalty when they do buy private coverage.

Many of the nation’s largest insurers, such as UnitedHealthcare, Cigna and Aetna, were never large players in the health law’s exchanges or they have pulled out citing steep financial losses. For them, the elimination of the health insurer tax makes the GOP bill look appealing, said Ana Gupte, a health analyst with Leerink, an investment bank. “The GOP bill is a net positive” for those insurers, she said.

Even insurers with many customers on ACA policies now will be better off financially in the GOP bill, Gupte said. “They will make a bigger [profit] margin on a smaller number of people,” she said.

Anthem, a larger player in the Obamacare marketplaces, has said the GOP bill would benefit insurers and individuals by ensuring that remaining insurers stay in the market to provide choices for consumers.

Health insurers’ cautious optimism about the bill contrasts with the rest of the health industry. Lobbying groups representing doctors, hospitals and nurses have objected vehemently to the legislation. AHIP spokeswoman Kristine Grow said the group remains concerned about the long term stability of the Medicaid health plan market because the GOP bill would kill the Medicaid expansion and reduce federal Medicaid funding to states. She also said it’s too early to know how insurers’ 2018 premiums would be affected under the GOP bill.

A big uncertainty for insurers is whether the Trump administration will continue to allow a key program under Obamacare that helps low-income individuals with out-of-pocket health costs. House Republicans suspended a lawsuit that claimed the $7 billion federal funding of the program was illegal.

The program’s future is of concern to Dr. J. Mario Molina, CEO of Molina Healthcare, which has 3 million Medicaid members and nearly 1 million customers on Obamacare exchange plans. The Long Beach, Calif.-based company operates in about a dozen states.

But Molina said his biggest concern is the GOP bill will return the country to the broken individual market system in place before 2014. “The main thing I am worried about is this bill will cause millions of people to lose insurance coverage,” he said.

Regardless of what Congress and the Trump administration decide to do with Medicaid’s federal funding, Molina predicted more states will shift Medicaid recipients into managed care plans to control costs. “In the short term, we will still grow,” he said.

Kaiser Health News (KHN) is a national health policy news service. It is an editorially independent program of the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation.

Woman sends thank you note to police after they arrest her daughter

It’s hard to be a parent when your child gets arrested. And not everyone takes it well.

But one mother showed gratitude to police who arrested her daughter in Florida while she was on spring break.

>> Read more trending news 

The Walton County Sheriff’s Office posted the text of a letter it received last week on its Facebook page. In the note, a mother thanks the department for arresting her 19-year-old daughter for underage drinking.

“Yesterday, my daughter was one of the thousands of spoiled spring breakers ‘living it up’ on the beach,” she wrote. “She got arrested for underage drinking. She was holding a can of beer on the beach. A stupid move that I warned her about before she left, but I’m just her mother, so ‘in one ear and out the other.’” 

She said the arrest taught her daughter a lesson, and she thanked the officers for their professionalism.

“The arrest scared the hell out of her, and I’m hoping she learned her lesson. The reason that I am sending this is that every officer that I talked to or that I could hear in the background talking to her was so nice! Firm, but nice,” the mother wrote. “For a mom hundreds of miles away, that was very reassuring. I know you all have to deal with this on a daily basis, which must be completely annoying, and I'm very sorry my daughter added to your workload yesterday. They say you always have one child that makes you go grey early and she is mine! Thank you for saving me a few more grey hairs last night.”

The post has been liked more than 3,000 times.

A 15-Minute Vinyasa Flow That Eases Neck Pain and Tension

A bad night's sleep, a killer upper-body workout, a long day hunched over your desk—whatever causes your neck pain and tension, you need relief fast. This 15-minute vinyasa flow will help soothe the sore muscles in your neck and around your upper spine. 

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You'll flow through a sequence of seated poses—that's right, you don't even need to stand up for this one. Just sit back, relax, and use your breath to guide you through each stretch and pose for relief. This practice is gentle and calming, making it a perfect choice for when you wake up with a stiff neck or before bed after a stressful day. All you need is a mat; then hit play to get started. 

Looking for more short and effective at-home workouts? Grokker has thousands of routines, so you’ll never get bored. Bonus: For a limited time, Greatist readers get 40 percent off Grokker Premium (just $9 per month) and their first 14 days free. Sign up now!

7 No-Bake Chocolate Desserts You Can Throw Together in 20 Minutes or Less

The next time you have a hankering for chocolate (probably right now), you can make an easy homemade treat without ever turning on the oven. Because, really, who has the patience to preheat when it's a chocolate emergency? This week's featured foodie, Megan Gilmore of Detoxinista, has tons of ideas for no-bake cookies, brownies, crumble bars, and puddings that we're drooling over. If the recipes in her newest cookbook, No Excuses Detox, are anything like these, then we'll be ordering ASAP. After one look at these seven chocolate recipes, you’ll have no excuse not to dive in tonight.

1. Vegan Almond Butter Buckeyes A healthier twist on the popular chocolate-covered peanut butter balls, these naturally sweetened almond butter truffles are cloaked in a quick 3-ingredient homemade chocolate shell. Feel free to use sunflower butter as a nut-free alternative too.  2. Vegan Mini Peanut Butter Cups These bite-size candies call for just five ingredients and are lower in sugar than the store-bought variety. If you have more time, Meghan suggests stuffing them into these Peanut Butter Temptation Cookies for an ultra-decadent treat—we're definitely doing that. 3. No-Bake Brownie Bites Calling for just four main ingredients, these chocolate bites taste like the rich brownies from the bakery next door. They're ready in half the time it would take to bake a batch and are sweetened with fruit... and that's it. 4. Vegan Cookie Dough "Ice Cream" You only need about 15 minutes and a mini-food chopper to make this quick and easy dairy-free ice cream. It's almost entirely sweetened with fruit, depending on whether you choose to add some mini dark chocolate chips or not (and we highly recommend that you do).  5. No-Bake Chocolate Pecan Crumble Bars Buttery pecans and sweet dates? Dream. And in these bars it's a double dream because they make up the crust and the crumbly top, with a layer of homemade chocolate in-between. These bars only take about 15 minutes of prep work, but you will need to let them set in your freezer for an hour or two before serving for best texture.  6. Creamy Chocolate Chia Pudding Most chia puddings have a tapioca-like texture, but when you blend it, the outcome is super-thick, smooth, and creamy. We'll take two for breakfast, thanks. 7. Easy Dark Chocolate Avocado Truffles If you needed one more reason to worship the avocado, here it is: These truffles get their creaminess from a ripe avocado, not heavy cream. And all you’ll taste is the chocolate.

You can find Megan on Facebook, Pinterest, Instagram, and Detoxinista.com. For exclusive recipes and meal plans, check out her cookbooks, Everyday Detox and the latest, No Excuses Detox, where she shares crowd-pleasing healthy recipes that are fast and affordable, using ingredients you probably already have in your pantry. (Available on amazon.com for $10.70.)

Popular Guarantee For Young Adults’ Coverage May Be Health Law’s Achilles’ Heel

The Affordable Care Act struck a popular chord by allowing adult children to obtain health coverage through a parent’s plan until their 26th birthday.

Now, seeking broad support for their efforts to repeal and replace the ACA, House Republicans have kept that guarantee intact. But it’s not clear whether that provision will be successful or a destabilizing force in the insurance marketplace.

The policy has proven to be a double-edged sword for the ACA’s online health exchanges because it has funneled young, healthy customers away from the overall marketplace “risk pool.” Insurers need those customers to balance out the large numbers of enrollees with chronic illnesses who drive up insurers’ costs — and ultimately contribute to higher marketplace premiums.

Joseph Antos, a health economist with the American Enterprise Institute, a Washington, D.C.-based conservative think tank, said the ability for young adults to stay on family plans represents a “critical mistake” within the health law, cutting off insurers from a large, healthy demographic that likely would be able to afford a health care plan.

“This is essentially an ideal group for an insurance company,” he said. “They’re not going to use many services, and they’re going to pay their bills.”

The young-adult provision went into effect in September 2010 and families put it to use quickly, with many young adults leaving their own insurance plans. A report published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 2013 found the percentage of adults ages 19 to 25 with personal plans fell from nearly 41 percent in 2010 to just over 27 percent in 2012, while the ratio of those covered through a family member’s plan rose by 14 percentage points.

And the Department of Health and Human Services said last year that final 2016 marketplace enrollment numbers showed more than 6 million people ages 19 to 25 gained insurance through the health law, including 2.3 million who went onto their family health plan between September 2010 and when online marketplaces began operating in 2014.

Cara Kelly, a vice president of the health care consulting firm Avalere Health, said the provision’s effect must be understood in the context of the law’s implementation. Affordability and the selection of plans available in the marketplace also could have influenced the decision among young adults to buy or shirk insurance, Kelly said. Even if the provision had not been included in the law, she said, one can’t assume that the young adults would have signed up for coverage.

A little more than a quarter of marketplace customers in 2016 were adults ages 18 to 34, according to data from the Department of Health and Human Services. But federal officials and insurers had hoped for higher rates, noting that the group made up about 40 percent of the potential market.

Public support for the young-adult provision makes it difficult to take away. A survey conducted by the Kaiser Family Foundation in December 2016 found that 8 in 10 Republicans and 9 in 10 Democrats favored the benefit. (Kaiser Health News is an editorially independent program of the foundation.)

[caption id="attachment_713549" align="alignright" width="443"] The young-adult provision went into effect in September 2010 and families put it to use quickly, with many young adults leaving their own insurance plans. (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)[/caption]

“It has been extremely popular,” said Al Redmer Jr., the Maryland insurance commissioner and chairman of the health insurance and managed care committee within the National Association of Insurance Commissioners. “So with that being the case, I don’t know if politically there’s an appetite to unwind it.”

Republicans have opted for different measures than the ACA to attract increased numbers of healthy, young customers and make the risk pools vibrant. To keep prices lower for these customers, the bill allows insurers to charge older people up to five times more than young adults. Under the ACA, that difference is 3-to-1, and Republicans say that made prices too expensive for younger customers.

It would also replace the health law’s individual mandate — the requirement that almost everyone have health insurance or face a penalty — with a 30 percent surcharge on their premium for late enrollment or allowing your insurance to lapse for more than 63 days within a year.

The overall effect, according to an analysis conducted by the Congressional Budget Office, would be a more stable market with a larger number of healthy enrollees. The report also estimated the bill could result in 24 million more people being uninsured.

But the bill also has disincentives for those young people. To help pay for premiums, low-income people will get tax credits based on age and household income. Older people would get $4,000 per year, twice as much as younger customers.

Insurers have reacted cautiously. The insurer Blue Cross Blue Shield Association released a statement this month expressing its support for increasing affordability for younger enrollees. But it also raised concerns about the Republicans’ tax credit proposal. A benefit based on age alone “does not give healthy people enough incentive to stay in the market, especially in the absence of an individual mandate.”

The insurance trade group America’s Health Insurance Plans sent a letter to House Republican committee chairmen voicing support for the 5-to-1 age-band rating and tax credits based on age.

“We have stated previously that there is no question that younger adults are under-represented in the individual market,” the letter said. “Recalibrating and reforming the way in which the premium assistance is structured will encourage younger Americans to get covered.”

KHN reporter Mary Agnes Carey contributed to this article.

Late Move To Dump ‘Essential’ Benefits Could Strand Chronically Ill

A last-minute attempt by conservative Republicans to dump standards for health benefits in plans sold to individuals would probably lower the average consumer’s upfront insurance costs, such as premiums and deductibles, said experts on both sides of the debate to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.

But, they add, it will likely also induce insurers to offer much skimpier plans, potentially excluding the gravely ill, and putting consumers at greater financial risk if they need care.

For example, a woman who had elected not to have maternity coverage could face financial ruin from an unintended pregnancy. A healthy young man who didn’t buy drug coverage could be bankrupted if diagnosed with cancer requiring expensive prescription medicine. Someone needing emergency treatment at a non-network hospital might not be covered.

What might be desirable for business would leave patients vulnerable.

“What you don’t want if you’re an insurer is only sick people buying whatever product you have,” said Christopher Koller, president of the Milbank Memorial Fund and a former Rhode Island insurance commissioner. “So the way to get healthy people is to offer cheaper products designed for the healthy people.”

The proposed change could give carriers wide room to do that by eliminating or shrinking “essential health benefits” including hospitalization, prescription drugs, mental health treatment and lab services from plan requirements — especially if state regulators don’t step in to fill the void, analysts said.

The Affordable Care Act requires companies selling coverage to individuals and families through online marketplaces to offer 10 essential benefits, which also include maternity, wellness and preventive services — plus emergency room treatment at all hospitals. Small-group plans offered by many small employers also must carry such benefits.

Conservative House Republicans want to exclude the rule from any replacement, arguing it drives up cost and stifles consumer choice.

On Thursday, President Donald Trump agreed after meeting with members of the conservative Freedom Caucus to leave it out of the measure under consideration, said White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer. “Part of the reason that premiums have spiked out of control is because under Obamacare, there were these mandated services that had to be included,” Spicer told reporters.

Pushed by Trump, House Republican leaders agreed late Thursday to a Friday vote on the bill but were still trying to line up support. “Tomorrow we will show the American people that we will repeal and replace this broken law because it’s collapsing and it’s failing families,” said House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.). “And tomorrow we’re proceeding.” When asked if he had the votes, Ryan didn’t answer and walked briskly away from the press corps.

But axing essential benefits could bring back the pre-ACA days when insurers avoided expensive patients by excluding services they needed, said Gary Claxton, a vice president and insurance expert at the Kaiser Family Foundation. (Kaiser Health News is an editorially independent program of the foundation.)

“They’re not going to offer benefits that attract people with chronic illness if they can help it,”said Claxton, whose collection of old insurance policies shows what the market looked like before.

One Aetna plan didn’t cover most mental health or addiction services — important to moderate Republicans as well as Democrats concerned about fighting the opioid crisis. Another Aetna plan didn’t cover any mental health treatment. A HealthNet plan didn’t cover outpatient rehabilitative services.

Before the ACA most individual plans didn’t include maternity coverage, either.

The House replacement bill could make individual coverage for the chronically ill even more scarce than a few years ago because it retains an ACA rule that forces plans to accept members with preexisting illness, analysts said.

Before President Barack Obama’s health overhaul, insurers could reject sick applicants or charge them higher premiums.

Lacking that ability under a Republican law but newly able to shrink benefits, insurers might be more tempted than ever to avoid covering expensive conditions. That way the sickest consumers wouldn’t even bother to apply.

“You could see even worse holes in the insurance package” than before the ACA, said Sabrina Corlette, a research professor at the Center on Health Insurance Reforms at Georgetown University. “If we’re going into a world where a carrier is going to have to accept all comers and they can’t charge them based on their health status, the benefit design becomes a much bigger deal” in how insurers keep the sick out of their plans, she said.

Michael Cannon, an analyst at the libertarian Cato Institute and a longtime Obamacare opponent, also believes dumping essential benefits while forcing insurers to accept all applicants at one “community” price would weaken coverage for chronically ill people.

“Getting rid of the essential health benefits in a community-rated market would cause coverage for the sick to get even worse than it is under current law,” he said. Republicans “are shooting themselves in the foot if they the offer this proposal.”

Cannon favors full repeal of the ACA, allowing insurers to charge higher premiums for more expensive patients and helping consumers pay for plans with tax-favored health savings accounts.

In an absence of federal requirements for benefits, existing state standards would become more important. Some states might move to upgrade required benefits in line with the ACA rules but others probably won’t, according to analysts.

“You’re going to have a lot of insurers in states trying to understand what existing laws they have in place,” Koller said. “It’s going to be really critical to see how quickly the states react. There are going to be some states that will not.”

Mary Agnes Carey and Phil Galewitz contributed to this story.

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