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Cam Newton benched for dress code violation

Carolina quarterback Cam Newton said after the Panthers' loss Sunday that he was benched from starting the game because he didn't wear a tie while traveling with the team to Seattle -- a requirement of coach Ron Rivera.

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"It came down to a dress code matter," Newton said. "I didn't follow dress code, and coach told me I wasn't going to start. I stand by his decision. His position he's in, I follow it."

Newton has been criticized plenty of times for his wardrobe choices.

"Growing up in Atlanta, I always had a sense of what fashion was, a sense of style. My parents always talked about the importance of making a first impression, and that's stayed with me," Newton said in a 2013 Esquire interview. 

One of the most notable pieces in his outfits has been his hats. They have even spawned their own hashtag, #CamCaps.

These are some of his looks at the podium this season:

<iframe src="//storify.com/cmgnationalnews/fall/embed?header=none&amp;border=false&amp;template=slideshow" width="100%" height="750" frameborder="no" allowtransparency="true"></iframe> <script src="//storify.com/cmgnationalnews/fall.js?header=none&amp;border=false&amp;template=slideshow"></script> [View the story "Cam Newton's outfits" on Storify]

Indian actress-turned-politician Jayaram Jayalalithaa dies

Jayaram Jayalalithaa, the hugely popular south Indian actress who later turned to politics and became the highest elected official in the state of Tamil Nadu, died Monday. She was 68.

The Apollo Hospital in the southern Indian city of Chennai said Jayalalithaa died at 11:30 p.m. local time Monday after undergoing surgery following a heart attack on Sunday night.

Known by her followers as "Amma," which means "Mother" in the Tamil language, Jayalalithaa inspired intense loyalty among film fans and political supporters alike.

As news of her death spread, thousands of people thronged the road long past midnight to watch as the ambulance carrying her body from the hospital to her home sped by in a motorcade. Police had a hard time controlling people from rushing onto the road. Many people wept and beat their breasts overcome by grief.

Earlier Monday, thousands of Jayalalithaa's supporters, wailing and crying, gathered outside the hospital to pray for her recovery. Police were deployed across the state to ensure security out of fear that her death could trigger widespread violence and riots.

The neighboring state of Karnataka stopped public buses from traveling to Tamil Nadu after one of its buses was attacked Monday.

The U.S. Consulate in Chennai put out an advisory urging Americans to be careful in the city and avoid large crowds.

The Tamil Nadu government declared a seven-day mourning period beginning Tuesday. Schools, colleges, offices and businesses were to be closed for the next three days, which have been designated a public holiday in the South Indian state.

Her body will be taken Tuesday to a public hall in Chennai to allow people to pay their respects. The date and time of her funeral has not yet been announced as the state government needed time to put in place security arrangements to handle the hundreds of thousands of people who are expected to attend.

Within hours of Jayalalithaa's death, her trusted lieutenant, O. Panneerselvam, was sworn in as chief minister of the state.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi said he was "deeply saddened" by Jayalalithaa's death. "Her demise has left a huge void in Indian politics," Modi tweeted.

Jayalalithaa's body would be kept in a public hall in Chennai for people to pay their respects. The date and time of her funeral had not been announced as the state government put security arrangements in place to control the hundreds of thousands of people who are expected to attend the funeral.

Jayalalithaa had already been in the hospital for two months since Sept. 22, when she was admitted with a fever, dehydration and a respiratory infection.

At the time, thousands of people prayed and fasted outside the hospital for her recovery. Doctors barred visitors, sparking rumors that they were withholding bad news out of fear it could trigger the same outpouring of grief, riots and suicides that followed the death of Jayalalithaa's political and acting mentor, M.G. Ramachandran.

Jayalalithaa was kept on a ventilator in the intensive care unit for weeks, doctors said. She also suffered from diabetes.

Jayalalithaa was 13 when she began her film career and quickly became known as a romantic lead in many of the nearly 150 Tamil-language movies that she worked on.

She entered politics in the early 1980s, under the guidance of Ramachandran. Soon after his death in 1987, she declared herself his political heir and took control of the All India Anna Dravida Munnetra Kazhgam party.

She served as Tamil Nadu's chief minister, the highest elected position in the state of 71 million people, for nearly 14 years over five terms beginning in 1991. She regained her office last year after a corruption case against her was overturned. Her supporters praised her efforts in fighting rural poverty with handouts like laptop computers for students, cows and goats for farmers, and spice grinders for homemakers.

Such free gifts are commonly used by Indian political parties in courting voters, but her handouts were still criticized by some as wasteful pandering and unfair bribery. But Jayalalithaa defended the giveaways as welfare measures aimed at helping the poor.

She herself was known for leading an extravagant lifestyle. In 1997, police found more than 10,000 saris and 750 pairs of shoes after raiding her home as part of a corruption investigation.

In the first half of 2014, Jayalalithaa made a bid to become India's prime minister job by saying she would form a coalition in New Delhi if no party dominated elections. But the Bharatiya Janata Party won a clear majority, catapulting Narendra Modi into the nation's top job.

Later that year, she was forced to step down as chief minister in Tamil Nadu state when she was sentenced to four years in prison for amassing more than $10 million during her political career, a wealth the court said was disproportionate to her income.

She spent 21 days behind bars before the Indian Supreme Court released her on bail. In May 2015, an appeals court overturned the corruption charges, clearing the way for her return to power. She returned to office as chief minister on May 23 and a month later was re-elected in a by-election.

Jayalalithaa was born in 1948 in the village of Melukote, in what is now the state of Karnataka. Her birth name was Jayalalitha, but she reportedly added an "a'' on advice from a numerologist.

Her lawyer father, also named Jayaram, died when she was 2, prompting her mother to learn shorthand and typing so she could work in a clerical position to support the family and put Jayalalithaa and her brother through school. Her brother died in the early 1990s.

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Hospital says Indian actress-turned-politician Jayalalithaa has died.

Hospital says Indian actress-turned-politician Jayalalithaa has died.

After Emmy, Sterling K Brown still winning with 'This Is Us'

Sterling K. Brown can chalk 2016 up as a win. He won an Emmy for his portrayal of Christopher Darden in FX's "The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story," and he's one of the stars of NBC's "This Is Us," which premiered this fall and is doing well in the ratings.

"This is probably the busiest time that I've had in my life so far," the 40-year-old actor said in a recent interview. "Busy is good, you know. Busy is better than bored and there's more recognition, like I try to feign the anonymity which I had before 'O.J.'"

"It has opened doors in terms of opportunities like auditions that would probably not have come my way in the past are now starting to become available to me so I'm enjoying it. It's really cool," he said.

"This Is Us" airs Tuesday on NBC (9 p.m. EST). The show also stars Milo Ventimiglia, Mandy Moore, Chrissy Metz and Justin Hartley.

Brown plays Randall, who was adopted by a white family. The story is told in two timelines, the past and the present.

"It's a really simple story," he said. "It's about a family, but the twist is that you get a chance to see the parents at the same age as the children in sort of this mid-thirties (time period) when you have all of these sort of critical decisions that sort of chart the rest of your life, you know? ... It reminds me of that moment when you say like, 'Oh, my parents — they're not perfect and it's OK that they're not perfect because they did the best that they knew how to do.'"

He recalls getting the script for the pilot episode while he was shooting "The People v. O.J." (Brown said he keeps his Emmy in the garage because it's sharp and he has two young children.)

"I was probably sitting at the prosecution's desk next to Sarah (Paulson), and I go, 'Yo, Sarah, I think I found something that I want to do.' She was like, 'Really? Is it really good?' I was like, 'Yeah, it's really good.'"

Brown especially enjoys reading fan reaction to "This Is Us" on social media as developments in the characters' lives are revealed in the present timeline.

"I love seeing the questions that the fans have like, 'When did Miguel (played by Jon Huertas) pop into the scene? Like, how the heck did that happen? What happened to his wife?' he laughed.

Brown says he counts himself as a fan and enjoys tuning in to see the various stories on the show unfold.

"I love the show and to be on something that you would love watching whether you are on it or not? That's the stuff."

___

Follow Alicia Rancilio online at http://www.twitter.com/aliciar

Black film studio in Florida given historic landmark status

A north Florida movie studio that produced silent-era films catering to an African-American audience has been designated a National Historic Landmark.

Florida Secretary of State Ken Detzner on Monday said that Norman Film Studios in Jacksonville has been given the honor.

The studio is now owned by the city of Jacksonville, which is working to partially restore the studio.

The studio's late owner, Richard Norman, was among the first filmmakers to produce movies that catered to African-Americans in the 1920s.

The silent-era movies often starred African-American actors in positive, professional film roles, such as lawyers and pilots.

The National Historic Landmarks program honors places that are nationally significant or historic.

'Crimetown' podcast tells of mob and political corruption

The podcast "Crimetown" opens with the mayor of Providence attacking a man with a lit cigarette and a fireplace log.

It's one of the many stranger-than-fiction tales about the late Mayor Buddy Cianci, the mafia and the city they both once ruled in this serial podcast from two of the people behind HBO's documentary miniseries "The Jinx."

Four episodes in, "Crimetown" is sitting at the top of the iTunes charts amid a resurgent interest in true crime stories such as the "Serial" podcast and Netflix's "Making a Murderer."

Co-creators Marc Smerling and Zac Stuart-Pontier said they were fascinated by the "tree roots" that connect people in the capital of the nation's smallest state, where politicians, cops and wise guys often grow up together.

"The connections between people are so close," Smerling said. "You're looking at a whole culture of crime."

The show details how, as a young prosecutor, Cianci went after Raymond Patriarca, the feared New England crime boss who reigned from his perch on the city's Federal Hill. Patriarca was acquitted, but Cianci parlayed his reputation as a mob buster to eke out a win for mayor.

As "Crimetown" reveals to listeners, he got out the vote during that 1974 campaign with a little help from one of Patriarca's goons. When Cianci rewarded him with a job, parks department head James Diamond objected.

"Basically, you do not hire professional murderers. Period. Buddy said that's the way the game is played in Providence," Diamond recounts in "Crimetown."

Cianci and others detailed in the series operate in a gray area, where there's no black and white, good or bad.

"He's a guy who was starting out a certain way," Stuart-Pontier said. "There's almost this Shakespearean quality that 30 years later he goes to prison."

That federal prison sentence came after Cianci ruled the city for more than 20 years during two separate stints as mayor. The first ended after the fireplace log attack — on a man Cianci thought was sleeping with his ex-wife. He pleaded no contest to felony assault in 1984 and resigned.

But voters returned him to office in 1990. Twelve years later, he was convicted of overseeing widespread corruption from City Hall.

Despite his crimes, voters loved him. His quick wit and one-liners landed him regularly on national TV and radio shows. He was a master self-promoter, and that rubbed off on Providence.

"Did Providence make Buddy or did Buddy make Providence is the central question," Smerling said.

Smerling said he found that Cianci, who died in January, was extremely self-aware. In one recording used in "Crimetown," Cianci explains what motivates politicians, including him.

"Nothing but ego and power," he said.

The creators expect to produce at least 18 episodes in Providence. After that, "Crimetown'''s second season will focus on a new place that is yet to be determined.

Smerling's past credits include producing the Academy Award-nominated documentary "Capturing the Friedmans." He and Stuart-Pontier were also behind 2015's "The Jinx: The Life and Deaths of Robert Durst," about the New York real estate heir and suspicions that he was involved in three murders.

Smerling calls Durst "evil" and says there's no one like him in "Crimetown." Instead, everyone — including the mobsters — live somewhere in that gray area, where you can understand how they got where they are and why they are motivated to do what they do.

"That's not to say that there won't be revelations that won't be extraordinary," Smerling said. "There will be revelations that people are going to go, 'Wow.'"

Jimmy Kimmel to host Academy Awards

The Oscars finally have a host: Jimmy Kimmel will emcee the 89th Academy Awards.

The late-night host will be presiding over the ceremony for the first time. Kimmel has been a regular awards host, having twice previously hosted the Emmy Awards (including its broadcast in September) and once led ESPN's ESPY Awards.

The selection of Kimmel gives ABC, home of the Oscars telecast, the choice the network had long sought. His "Jimmy Kimmel Live!" has previously followed ABC's Oscar broadcast. The network also has new muscle to flex; it signed a deal with the Academy of Motion Pictures in August to remain the Oscar broadcast home until 2028.

"Yes, I am hosting the Oscars," Kimmel said on Twitter. "This is not a prank. And if it is, my revenge on the academy will be terrible and sweet."

The academy waited much later than usual to name a host for the Feb. 26 ceremony. This year's show is being produced by veteran producer Michael De Luca and Jennifer Todd, president of Ben Affleck and Matt Damon's production company, Pearl Street Films. This is also their first time producing the Oscars.

The lengthy search has perhaps been a product of increasing pressure on the broadcast. Last year's show was hosted by Chris Rock and was dominated by backlash over its second straight year of all-white acting nominees. Its 34.3 million viewers marked an 11-year low for the telecast.

Whether Kimmel can spark a comeback will be a considerable test for the 49-year-old comedian. His Emmy Awards broadcast on ABC drew a mere 11.3 million viewers, a new low.

But ABC Television Group chief Ben Sherwood publicly lobbied for Kimmel. In September he said the network was "very hopeful that Jimmy will get" the Oscar hosting gig and that he had "elevated" the Emmys.

This year's Oscar favorites don't appear to feature the kind of big, popular films that can drive audiences to watch the awards. The top contenders — "Moonlight," ''La La Land" and "Manchester by the Sea" — have together totaled less than $15 million at the box office, though "La La Land" is yet to open.

Jimmy Kimmel to host Academy Awards

The Oscars finally have a host: Jimmy Kimmel will emcee the 89th Academy Awards.

The late-night host will be presiding over the ceremony for the first time. Kimmel has been a regular awards host, having twice previously hosted the Emmy Awards (including its broadcast in September) and once led ESPN's ESPY Awards.

The selection of Kimmel gives ABC, home of the Oscars telecast, the choice the network had long sought. His "Jimmy Kimmel Live!" has previously followed ABC's Oscar broadcast. The network also has new muscle to flex; it signed a deal with the Academy of Motion Pictures in August to remain the Oscar broadcast home until 2028.

"Yes, I am hosting the Oscars," Kimmel said on Twitter. "This is not a prank. And if it is, my revenge on the academy will be terrible and sweet."

The academy waited much later than usual to name a host for the Feb. 26 ceremony. This year's show is being produced by veteran producer Michael De Luca and Jennifer Todd, president of Ben Affleck and Matt Damon's production company, Pearl Street Films. This is also their first time producing the Oscars.

The lengthy search has perhaps been a product of increasing pressure on the broadcast. Last year's show was hosted by Chris Rock and was dominated by backlash over its second straight year of all-white acting nominees. Its 34.3 million viewers marked an 11-year low for the telecast.

Whether Kimmel can spark a comeback will be a considerable test for the 49-year-old comedian. His Emmy Awards broadcast on ABC drew a mere 11.3 million viewers, a new low.

But ABC Television Group chief Ben Sherwood publicly lobbied for Kimmel. In September he said the network was "very hopeful that Jimmy will get" the Oscar hosting gig and that he had "elevated" the Emmys.

This year's Oscar favorites don't appear to feature the kind of big, popular films that can drive audiences to watch the awards. The top contenders — "Moonlight," ''La La Land" and "Manchester by the Sea" — have together totaled less than $15 million at the box office, though "La La Land" is yet to open.

In bid to fight art fraud, Sotheby's acquires forensic lab

In bid to fight art fraud, Sotheby's announced Monday that it had purchased a forensics firm whose founder once helped the auction house belatedly identify a $10 million painting as a fake.

Sotheby's said that Orion Analytical, based in Williamstown, Massachusetts, will be folded into the company and its founder, the artist, conservator and forensic scientist James Martin, will lead a new scientific research department charged with making sure the works the auction house deals with are authentic.

The purchase comes amid a number of recent art forgeries in the art world, including a supposed Old Master painting that was sold by Sotheby's to an art collector for $10 million in a private sale in 2011.

In March of this year, Sotheby's declared "Portrait of a Man" by Frans Hals a fake after questions arose about its authenticity. An in-depth technical analysis by Orion, reviewed by another conservation scientist, confirmed the suspicion. The forger remains unknown.

Sotheby's said Monday that the acquisition of Orion Martin's appointment would add to collectors' confidence in the auction house.

Martin, who founded Orion Analytical in 1990, has analyzed the chemical and structural composition of disputed artworks for clients around the world, including private collectors, museums, galleries and the FBI.

"Rather than being retained on a series of one-off assignments when issues arise, Jamie will be establishing a set of protocols to determine which works should be examined proactively, as well as training our specialist staff to identify potential issues, placing us in a position to provide even greater service to our clients," in the areas of art, objects and wine, Sotheby's said.

New York art attorney Peter Stern called Sotheby's move "brilliant" and said Martin was "one of the most highly respected art analysts in the world."

Among his nearly 2,000 investigations, Martin examined the paintings in a sensational art fraud case involving the once highly respected Knoedler & Company, a Manhattan gallery accused of selling forged fakes of modern masters like Jackson Pollock and Mark Rothko for millions of dollars.

The 150-year-old gallery closed in 2011. The bogus paintings, created by a Chinese immigrant in New York City, were sold between 1994 and 2011. The civil trial ended in a settlement in February. The terms were not disclosed.

"Knoedler's lesson may well be that art attorneys need to educate clients who are buying artworks to require warranties relating to authenticity," Chicago-based art attorney Scott Hodes said. "The Orion Analytical acquisition has spotlighted this need."

"Sotheby's will definitely be in a better position than its competition to detect forgeries," he added.

Artworks have long been authenticated based on provenance, style, and paint pigments. But in an art market where buyers think nothing of spending several millions of dollars on one piece of art, scientific examination that uses state-of-the-art technical imaging, molecular analysis, magnified visual inspection and other sophisticated methods, adds another layer of assurance that a work is real. It also can protect buyers and sellers from monetary losses and protect the integrity of artists and their works.

Martin has taught at The Getty Conservation Institute and The Smithsonian's Museum Conservation Institute and will continue to teach and consult with museums and conservators as part of his work at Sotheby's.

"The range of works offered by Sotheby's, as well as the breadth of existing expertise and experience, provides for a unique opportunity to leverage my capabilities across the company's global platform," Martin said in a statement.

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