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DJ Khaled book 'The Keys' coming in November

DJ Khaled wants it all written down.

The hip-hop producer and artist, radio personality and Snapchat favorite has a deal with Crown Archetype for "The Keys," to be published Nov. 22.

According to Wednesday's announcement by Crown, the book will feature personal stories, his philosophy for success and the background for some of his catchphrases, such as "special cloth alert" and "bless up."

The book's title refers to what Khaled has called his bits of advice. He said that he wanted to let everybody know the bits are the keys from his perspective.

Khaled's most recent album, "Major Key," came out last summer.

California governor signs bill dumping rape-reporting limit

The emotional stories of women who say they were sexually assaulted more than a decade ago by comedian Bill Cosby prompted California state lawmakers to approve a bill to eliminate the state's 10-year limit on filing rape and related charges.

On Wednesday, Gov. Jerry Brown announced that he has approved the legislation to revoke that limitation.

Beginning next year, the bill will end the statute of limitations in certain rape and child molestation cases. It will also end the time limit on older cases in which the statute of limitations has not yet expired.

The new law, SB813, will not, however, help women who made allegations against Cosby dating back more than 10 years, including some from the 1960s.

Cosby has repeatedly denied the sex abuse allegations made by dozens of women nationwide. He is facing just one criminal case stemming from sex abuse. A trial is set to begin in June in Pennsylvania.

Defense lawyer Angela Agrusa has said Cosby's accusers have stirred passions even though their stories of abuse have not been investigated by police.

California lawmakers sent the statute of limitations bill to Brown without a single dissenting vote.

State Sen. Connie Leyva, D-Chino, credited intense lobbying of lawmakers and the governor by advocates who "kept the fight alive for the countless rape victims that have already spoken up and also those that have yet to come forward."

The bill's signing "tells every rape and sexual assault victim in California that they matter and that, regardless of when they are ready to come forward, they will always have an opportunity to seek justice in a court of law," she said in a statement. "Rapists should never be able to evade legal consequences simply because an arbitrary time limit has expired. There must never be an expiration date on justice!"

Seventeen other states already have no statute of limitations on rape, according to the California Women's Law Center.

In June, Colorado doubled the amount of time sexual assault victims have to seek charges from 10 to 20 years, a decision also prompted by the Cosby allegations. Nevada extended its time limit from four to 20 years last year after testimony by one of Cosby's accusers.

Advocates say victims may need years before they can bring themselves to make an allegation to law enforcement. Several women said during a spring legislative hearing on the California bill that they did not come forward sooner because they were traumatized or afraid no one would believe them.

However, if they wait 10 years, victims find "the door to the courthouse is slammed in her face," said high-profile Los Angeles attorney Gloria Allred, who represents 30 women who say they were sexually assaulted more than a decade ago by Bill Cosby. None can bring criminal charges because the time limit has expired.

Civil rights groups and public defenders countered that extending the time limit could lead to false convictions as evidence disappears and memories fade among victims and witnesses. They say it's not fair to expect a suspect to recall an alibi decades later.

It could even be counterproductive, California Public Defenders Association representative Carolyn George argued, because the time limit encourages victims to come forward and investigators to move quickly.

Alec Baldwin's very big deal: playing Donald Trump on 'SNL'

"Saturday Night Live" has made a YUGE decision: It has chosen Alec Baldwin to impersonate GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump.

NBC announced this deal Wednesday with a promo on social media, just days before "SNL" begins its 42nd season and little more than a month before voters choose between Trump and his Democratic opponent, Hillary Clinton.

Baldwin, a veteran "SNL" guest host, will debut his Trump impression opposite cast member Kate McKinnon's continuing turn as Clinton. Trump had previously been played by announcer Darrell Hammond and by the now-departed Taran Killam.

Previously, "SNL" went over the heads of its cast to select Larry David to play former presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders.

Saturday's premiere features Margot Robbie as guest host, with musical guest The Weeknd. It airs at 11:30 p.m. EDT.

Rihanna, new top designers debut at Paris Fashion Week

New designer debuts from powerhouses Lanvin and Saint Laurent — and popstar Rihanna's first Paris catwalk show for Fenty Puma — marked the start of Spring-Summer 2017 shows in the City of Light.

Here are the highlights of ready-to-wear collections.

SAINT LAURENT DEBUT

A huge crane in the colors of the French flag hoisted a giant neon YSL logo above a construction site in the French capital, literally setting expectations high for this year's YSL show at Paris Fashion Week.

The decor announced that the grand debut from Saint Laurent's new designer, Anthony Vaccarello, on Tuesday night aimed to dramatically reconstruct the YSL aesthetic following the departure of Hedi Slimane.

French singer Jane Birkin and her two actress daughters, Charlotte Gainsbourg and Lou Doillon, stared up expectantly alongside myriad iPhone-snapping fashionistas to marvel at the radiant 50-meter (164-foot) crane — a machine being used to rebuild the house's Left Bank headquarters in Paris.

"The derelict aspect sets a nice metaphor," said Gainsbourg, speaking from the show's front row.

As the designer's revealing looks filed by, the metaphor of reconstruction and renewal of the Saint Laurent image was heard loud and clear, but the high expectations set by the decor were dashed.

This "new" image was largely a rehash of the Glamazon, uber-sexy, ultra-mini styles that have come to be synonymous with the 34-year-old Italian-Belgian designer's own brand and his work at Donatella Versace's flesh-baring Versus house.

To his credit, Vaccarello's debut featured a check-list of YSL archive references, with iconic YSL pieces fused alongside the sex aesthetic.

A sultry leather variation on the voluminous sleeves of the Flamenco Dress shimmered with a cool '80s micro-mini. Yves Saint Laurent's 1968 transparent looks, which once shocked the fashion establishment, made a comeback and Vaccarello gave a nod to the textured materials of the famed 1976 Ballets Russes collection.

There was also, at times, a marked return to elegance, which had eluded his predecessor Slimane. Those touches turned up in revamped archive YSL tuxedos and lashings of black.

It was certainly not a groundbreaking collection, but many of the styles could prove highly appealing to the younger clients the house has courted in recent years.

RIHANNA CHANNELS DIVERSITY

The most striking thing about Rihanna's catwalk collection for Fenty Puma was the models.

There has been increasing criticism in recent years that fashion shows in the major capitals have a dearth of models from different ethnic backgrounds.

So the popstar's latest outing for the sports brand garnered praise for its use of male and female models from diverse backgrounds.

The catwalk collection itself — Rihanna's first in Paris — got a more lukewarm reception.

Pearl necklaces, lace headdresses, sheer shawls, fabric fans and glimmering corsets took inspiration from 18th century France. But against the backdrop of the venue, the grand 18th century Hotel Salomon de Rothschild, they came across as somewhat saccharine.

Loose pastel-colored silhouettes that floated seemed at times overly embellished, and there was a cluttered feel to some of the layering and gathered detailing that moved in convergent directions.

Still, there were some nice styles — such a coat or a silken jumpsuit that unraveled at the shoulder that captured the feeling of hurried undress.

"I am really excited about this collection as it's very fun and light," Rihanna said.

"Showing in Paris was the perfect backdrop, as I pulled a lot of inspiration from France, Marie Antoinette and the Palace of Versailles specifically," she added.

FEMALE DESIGNERS ON THE UP

Women's fashion is very much a male-dominated world.

But things are slowly changing in Paris.

First it was Hermes that appointed a woman, Nadege Vanhee-Cybulski, to be its new creative director. And now it's Lanvin's turn.

Bouchra Jarrar unveiled her first collection for the storied house that was originally founded by a woman — Jeanne Lanvin — in the early 20th century.

Hermes' menswear designer, Veronique Nichanian — one of the few women who designs for men — sat proudly on the Lanvin front row Wednesday.

"It's ironic that most designers who design for women are men," Nichanian told The AP.

"It's wonderful that there are now women at Lanvin and Hermes, but they have come because of their talent, and not because of their sex," she added.

LANVIN DEBUT

Jarrar treated guests to a rich, sumptuous and accomplished debut at Lanvin's Spring-Summer show, which was held inside Paris' gilded, but rather stuffy Hotel de Ville.

Overheated fashion insiders fanned themselves with floral Oriental paper fans provided by the house.

As it happened, the elegance and delicacy were translated into the clothes.

They fused Jarrar's signature intricate couture with silk Lanvin archive gowns that were draped and gathered, evoking the house's heyday of the 1920s.

Silhouettes were loose and long, featuring complex plays on lines and asymmetry as well as dazzlingly contrasting materials.

Lacquered velvet mixed with silk chiffon and powdered satin pants, lace sequins, gold petal embroideries and diaphanous organza.

Sheer, colored gowns — such as a series in vivid bluebonnet — gave this strong debut a memorable vibrancy.

But the collection wasn't all softly feminine.

A welcome dark, brooding edge provided by large black feathers embroidered on menswear jackets nicely balanced the diverse, 49-piece display.

DRIES VAN NOTEN GOES ORIENTAL, VICTORIAN

Master of contradictions Dries Van Noten went to the Orient for inspiration for his vivid Spring-Summer collection.

A silken Japanese kimono coat with large lapels in midnight blue, worn by an Asian model, appeared alongside a modernized version of the raised Japanese "Geta" sandal.

Vivid floral prints — with standout acid yellow — also peppered the color-rich show and reminded the audience of the Belgian designer's unrelenting passion for blooms, which he tenderly cultivates in his garden at home.

But to pin the ever-creative 58-year-old down would be an impossible exercise as Wednesday's diverse show proved.

He mixed up his Oriental musings — of course — with flashes of the vestimentary styles of Victorian England.

Voluminous 19th century leg of mutton sleeves were fused with matronly high neck details in Victorian lace, as well as beading and needlework from that period.

Successfully combining the two diverse references is a feat that few designers could pull off.

But here, it worked.

___

Thomas Adamson can be followed at Twitter.com/ThomasAdamsonAP

Alec Baldwin's very big deal: playing Donald Trump on 'SNL'

"Saturday Night Live" has made a YUGE decision: It has chosen Alec Baldwin to impersonate GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump.

NBC announced this deal Wednesday with a promo on social media, just days before "SNL" begins its 42nd season and little more than a month before voters choose between Trump and his Democratic opponent, Hillary Clinton.

Baldwin, a veteran "SNL" guest host, will debut his Trump impression opposite cast member Kate McKinnon's continuing turn as Clinton. Trump had previously been played by announcer Darrell Hammond and by the now-departed Taran Killam.

Previously, "SNL" went over the heads of its cast to select Larry David to play former presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders.

Saturday's premiere features Margot Robbie as guest host, with musical guest The Weeknd. It airs at 11:30 p.m. EDT.

Rihanna, new top designers debut at Paris Fashion Week

New designer debuts from powerhouses Lanvin and Saint Laurent — and popstar Rihanna's first Paris catwalk show for Fenty Puma — marked the start of Spring-Summer 2017 shows in the City of Light.

Here are the highlights of ready-to-wear collections.

SAINT LAURENT DEBUT

A huge crane in the colors of the French flag hoisted a giant neon YSL logo above a construction site in the French capital, literally setting expectations high for this year's YSL show at Paris Fashion Week.

The decor announced that the grand debut from Saint Laurent's new designer, Anthony Vaccarello, on Tuesday night aimed to dramatically reconstruct the YSL aesthetic following the departure of Hedi Slimane.

French singer Jane Birkin and her two actress daughters, Charlotte Gainsbourg and Lou Doillon, stared up expectantly alongside myriad iPhone-snapping fashionistas to marvel at the radiant 50-meter (164-foot) crane — a machine being used to rebuild the house's Left Bank headquarters in Paris.

"The derelict aspect sets a nice metaphor," said Gainsbourg, speaking from the show's front row.

As the designer's revealing looks filed by, the metaphor of reconstruction and renewal of the Saint Laurent image was heard loud and clear, but the high expectations set by the decor were dashed.

This "new" image was largely a rehash of the Glamazon, uber-sexy, ultra-mini styles that have come to be synonymous with the 34-year-old Italian-Belgian designer's own brand and his work at Donatella Versace's flesh-baring Versus house.

To his credit, Vaccarello's debut featured a check-list of YSL archive references, with iconic YSL pieces fused alongside the sex aesthetic.

A sultry leather variation on the voluminous sleeves of the Flamenco Dress shimmered with a cool '80s micro-mini. Yves Saint Laurent's 1968 transparent looks, which once shocked the fashion establishment, made a comeback and Vaccarello gave a nod to the textured materials of the famed 1976 Ballets Russes collection.

There was also, at times, a marked return to elegance, which had eluded his predecessor Slimane. Those touches turned up in revamped archive YSL tuxedos and lashings of black.

It was certainly not a groundbreaking collection, but many of the styles could prove highly appealing to the younger clients the house has courted in recent years.

RIHANNA CHANNELS DIVERSITY

The most striking thing about Rihanna's catwalk collection for Fenty Puma was the models.

There has been increasing criticism in recent years that fashion shows in the major capitals have a dearth of models from different ethnic backgrounds.

So the popstar's latest outing for the sports brand garnered praise for its use of male and female models from diverse backgrounds.

The catwalk collection itself — Rihanna's first in Paris — got a more lukewarm reception.

Pearl necklaces, lace headdresses, sheer shawls, fabric fans and glimmering corsets took inspiration from 18th century France. But against the backdrop of the venue, the grand 18th century Hotel Salomon de Rothschild, they came across as somewhat saccharine.

Loose pastel-colored silhouettes that floated seemed at times overly embellished, and there was a cluttered feel to some of the layering and gathered detailing that moved in convergent directions.

Still, there were some nice styles — such a coat or a silken jumpsuit that unraveled at the shoulder that captured the feeling of hurried undress.

"I am really excited about this collection as it's very fun and light," Rihanna said.

"Showing in Paris was the perfect backdrop, as I pulled a lot of inspiration from France, Marie Antoinette and the Palace of Versailles specifically," she added.

FEMALE DESIGNERS ON THE UP

Women's fashion is very much a male-dominated world.

But things are slowly changing in Paris.

First it was Hermes that appointed a woman, Nadege Vanhee-Cybulski, to be its new creative director. And now it's Lanvin's turn.

Bouchra Jarrar unveiled her first collection for the storied house that was originally founded by a woman — Jeanne Lanvin — in the early 20th century.

Hermes' menswear designer, Veronique Nichanian — one of the few women who designs for men — sat proudly on the Lanvin front row Wednesday.

"It's ironic that most designers who design for women are men," Nichanian told The AP.

"It's wonderful that there are now women at Lanvin and Hermes, but they have come because of their talent, and not because of their sex," she added.

LANVIN DEBUT

Jarrar treated guests to a rich, sumptuous and accomplished debut at Lanvin's Spring-Summer show, which was held inside Paris' gilded, but rather stuffy Hotel de Ville.

Overheated fashion insiders fanned themselves with floral Oriental paper fans provided by the house.

As it happened, the elegance and delicacy were translated into the clothes.

They fused Jarrar's signature intricate couture with silk Lanvin archive gowns that were draped and gathered, evoking the house's heyday of the 1920s.

Silhouettes were loose and long, featuring complex plays on lines and asymmetry as well as dazzlingly contrasting materials.

Lacquered velvet mixed with silk chiffon and powdered satin pants, lace sequins, gold petal embroideries and diaphanous organza.

Sheer, colored gowns — such as a series in vivid bluebonnet — gave this strong debut a memorable vibrancy.

But the collection wasn't all softly feminine.

A welcome dark, brooding edge provided by large black feathers embroidered on menswear jackets nicely balanced the diverse, 49-piece display.

DRIES VAN NOTEN GOES ORIENTAL, VICTORIAN

Master of contradictions Dries Van Noten went to the Orient for inspiration for his vivid Spring-Summer collection.

A silken Japanese kimono coat with large lapels in midnight blue, worn by an Asian model, appeared alongside a modernized version of the raised Japanese "Geta" sandal.

Vivid floral prints — with standout acid yellow — also peppered the color-rich show and reminded the audience of the Belgian designer's unrelenting passion for blooms, which he tenderly cultivates in his garden at home.

But to pin the ever-creative 58-year-old down would be an impossible exercise as Wednesday's diverse show proved.

He mixed up his Oriental musings — of course — with flashes of the vestimentary styles of Victorian England.

Voluminous 19th century leg of mutton sleeves were fused with matronly high neck details in Victorian lace, as well as beading and needlework from that period.

Successfully combining the two diverse references is a feat that few designers could pull off.

But here, it worked.

___

Thomas Adamson can be followed at Twitter.com/ThomasAdamsonAP

George Takei gives personal collection to Los Angeles museum

Actor and activist George Takei is donating a trove of art and artifacts from his life and career to the Japanese American National Museum in Los Angeles.

The museum announced the gift Wednesday and said the collection will be featured in an exhibition next year. "New Frontiers: The Many Worlds of George Takei" is set to open March 12, 2017.

Takei's collection includes photos, sculptures, scripts and other memorabilia from his "Star Trek" days, as well as his run for Los Angeles City Council in 1973 and the Olympic torch he carried ahead of the 1984 games in Los Angeles.

Takei's most recent acting credit was in the animated "Kubo and the Two Strings." The 79-year-old entertainer is an activist for gay rights and spokesman for the Human Rights Campaign.

George Takei gives personal collection to Los Angeles museum

Actor and activist George Takei is donating a trove of art and artifacts from his life and career to the Japanese American National Museum in Los Angeles.

The museum announced the gift Wednesday and said the collection will be featured in an exhibition next year. "New Frontiers: The Many Worlds of George Takei" is set to open March 12, 2017.

Takei's collection includes photos, sculptures, scripts and other memorabilia from his "Star Trek" days, as well as his run for Los Angeles City Council in 1973 and the Olympic torch he carried ahead of the 1984 games in Los Angeles.

Takei's most recent acting credit was in the animated "Kubo and the Two Strings." The 79-year-old entertainer is an activist for gay rights and spokesman for the Human Rights Campaign.

Man accosts Kim Kardashian in Paris for second time

Serial celebrity accoster Vitalii Sediuk has struck again, this time at Paris Fashion Week, targeting Kim Kardashian's derriere as she was entering the exclusive L'Avenue restaurant.

Kardashian's makeup artist Mario Dedivanovic caught the Wednesday incident on video and posted it to his Instagram account.

It showed the reality television star negotiating her way through a crowd of paparazzi past her black car, as Sediuk, a former Ukrainian television reporter, swooped in and attempted to kiss Kardashian's posterior.

The security detail is seen to react immediately and pull him to the floor amid cries and expletives from the crowd.

Paris police said that they had no immediate indication a formal complaint had been filed.

It's the second such time the television reality star falls victim to Sediuk's unwelcome attention after she was accosted two years ago outside a Balmain show. He caused her to stumble briefly in Paris when he provoked a kerfuffle outside the fashion week venue.

He told The Associated Press in an email last week that he objected to having the Kardashians featured in Vogue magazine.

Sediuk previously spent two days in jail after jostling with Brad Pitt at a Los Angeles film premiere, and he crawled underneath America Ferrera's dress at a film premiere at the Cannes festival.

He also accosted model Gigi Hadid at Milan Fashion Week last week, calling it a form of protest against the use of celebrity models.

A video posted on website TMZ.com of that incident showed a man grabbing Hadid from behind and lifting her off the ground as she and her sister, Bella Hadid, exited the venue of the Max Mara runway show last Thursday morning. Hadid reacted angrily, wriggling out of his grip, saying "Let go of me!" followed by expletives.

In 'American Honey,' finding family in a hopeless place

The face filmmaker Andrea Arnold makes at the thought of storyboarding her films is the kind of bitter, disgusted look most people reserve for a bath full of leeches.

Once her "Eww!" has receded, the British director leans forward and explains why she won't sketch her shots in advance. "I want to bring life into what I'm doing," she says. "I try to create that sort of atmosphere which involves not being too structured. If I start controlling it too much, I think the life goes."

Arnold pauses to consider and then concludes: "I quite like to get in there and see what's what."

Life rushes through Arnold's heartland odyssey "American Honey" with a freewheeling electricity that the Beats would have admired even if the tunes (Rihanna, Drake, Big Sean) were puzzlingly unfamiliar. An immersive and exuberantly sensory road movie, "American Honey" follows the cross-country road trip of aimless but colorful teenagers selling magazines door-to-door as a way to party across the Midwest.

"American Honey" has its own band of merry pranksters, too. Though the movie's actors include a few young stars (Shia LaBeouf, Riley Keough), Arnold mostly found her cast on her own research trips around the county, at spring break clubs on the Florida coast and county fairs in Appalachia.

"We were all real people, cast from the streets. All of the situations we were coming from were pretty bad," says Raymond "Ray Ray" Coalson. "We legitly became family because we were all misfits and this brought us together."

Just as the making of "American Honey" was unorthodox, so has its presence been on the festival circuit. In Cannes, where the film won the Jury Prize, the group danced down the red carpet to E-40's "Choice (Yup)." At the Toronto International Film Festival, they traversed the city in a party bus not unlike the van they ride in the film. Collectively, they are a dancing blur of tattoos, skateboards, hugs and tears.

Arnold, the 55-year-old director of "Fish Tank" and "Wuthering Heights," is the matriarch of their improvised family, shepherding her cast from nowhere and into one of the most acclaimed films of the year. Sasha Lane, then a Texas-native college student on spring break, now the film's breakout star, initially worried Arnold was casting for pornography. Then she watched her rescue passed out kids along Panama Beach.

"I witnessed her doing things like that," says Lane. "Her energy, for one, is very pure. And her telling me that I was beautiful the way I was, and seeing her help people on the street, you knew that she would have your back."

Arnold and Lane recently slid into a restaurant booth in Toronto, both still emotional from the ride they've been on the last year. Arnold may be in charge, but her pensive demeanor belies her eager playfulness. "The bus is the best," Arnold says before wondering if the loud music was disturbing Toronto citizens. "Quite rude with the Big Sean, actually," she says, referring to the hip-hop artist in their mobile mix.

Arnold came to the story of magazine-selling crews from a 2007 New York Times article . The itinerant journeys, from cheap motel to cheap motel, were filled with drugs, alcohol and sex. The world, and its surrogate families, appealed to Arnold.

"Here they are selling things on a minibus. It's kind of a little version of capitalism," Arnold says. "It's in a nutshell the biggest picture: selling and trying to find your place in this big country."

To write her script, Arnold traveled through West Virginia towns, emptied by mine closures, and through impoverished areas of the South and Midwest. The vision of America in "American Honey" is one of opiate addiction, highways and soda. In one memorable scene, the crew dances to Rihanna's "We Found Love" in a Walmart. (Arnold wrote the pop star a letter to get permission for the song.)

Arnold grants she witnessed a lot of poverty and hopelessness, but isn't inclined to make any pronouncement on the soul of America.

"Environment obviously affects us but we also have an impact on our lives too," says Arnold. "If you grow up in a certain situation but you don't believe in yourself, how do you get out of that? So it's complicated. I couldn't possibly say something simple about it."

During shooting, the cast and crew lived much like the magazine crews: piled into motel rooms, their destinations often chosen at the last minute. Michael Fassbender, who starred in Arnold's "Fish Tank," says her way of making a movie is uncommonly organic: "Andrea can create chaos and capture it so well," Fassbender says. "A lot of directors can create it and not capture it."

For movie novices like Lane, it was a strange baptism. "Every day I was reminded, 'This is not how normal movies are made, Sasha, by the way,'" says Lane.

Lane, who turns 21 Thursday, now has a budding movie career. Like her fellow cast members, her life has be forever altered by Arnold and "American Honey."

"She saved my life in a way because I know that part of America," says Lane, beginning to cry. "We all had something that we were looking for. She gave me this hope that you can have another life besides the one you grew up with. I went from hopeless to: No, you can shine."

___

Follow AP Film Writer Jake Coyle on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/jakecoyleAP

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