Last Song Played
San Antonio's Greatest Hits
On Air
No Program
Last Song Played
San Antonio's Greatest Hits

entertainment

200 items
Results 1 - 10 of 200 next >

The top 10 movies on the iTunes Store

iTunes Movies US Charts:

1. The Accountant (2016)

2. Deepwater Horizon

3. Storks

4. Sully

5. Café Society

6. Keeping Up With the Joneses

7. Jason Bourne

8. Kevin Hart: What Now?

9. The Girl On the Train (2016)

10. The Secret Life of Pets

iTunes Movies US Charts - Independent:

1. The Dressmaker

2. The Book of Love

3. The Infiltrator

4. Blood Father

5. The Autopsy of Jane Doe

6. Christine (2016)

7. Kate Plays Christine

8. A Man Called Ove

9. American Honey

10. Banking on Bitcoin

__

(copyright) 2017 Apple Inc.

Chicago, LA, Hamburg join in John Neumeier's 'Orphee'

The Lyric Opera of Chicago, LA Opera and Germany's Staatsoper Hamburg are collaborating with the Joffrey Ballet for the first time on a new production of Gluck's "Orphee et Eurydice" by choreographer John Neumeier.

The companies said Tuesday that Neumeier, a Milwaukee native who works mostly in Europe, will direct, design and choreograph the staging, which will open Chicago's 2017-18 season and run from Sept. 23-Oct. 15. It will be seen in Los Angeles from March 10-25, 2018, and in Hamburg from Feb. 3-19, 2019.

Harry Bicket will conduct tenor Dmitry Korchak and soprano Andriana Chuchman in Chicago, and music director James Conlon will lead tenor Maxim Mironov and soprano Lisette Oropesa in Los Angeles.

The 1774 Paris version will be used that includes the ballet music "Dance of the Furies" and "Dance of the Blessed Spirits."

Chicago, LA, Hamburg join in John Neumeier's 'Orphee'

The Lyric Opera of Chicago, LA Opera and Germany's Staatsoper Hamburg are collaborating with the Joffrey Ballet for the first time on a new production of Gluck's "Orphee et Eurydice" by choreographer John Neumeier.

The companies said Tuesday that Neumeier, a Milwaukee native who works mostly in Europe, will direct, design and choreograph the staging, which will open Chicago's 2017-18 season and run from Sept. 23-Oct. 15. It will be seen in Los Angeles from March 10-25, 2018, and in Hamburg from Feb. 3-19, 2019.

Harry Bicket will conduct tenor Dmitry Korchak and soprano Andriana Chuchman in Chicago, and music director James Conlon will lead tenor Maxim Mironov and soprano Lisette Oropesa in Los Angeles.

The 1774 Paris version will be used that includes the ballet music "Dance of the Furies" and "Dance of the Blessed Spirits."

Police: Man posed as Bieber online to extort nude photos

A Massachusetts man was arrested on suspicion of soliciting nude photos from a 9-year-old California girl while posing online as Justin Bieber, authorities said Tuesday.

Bryan Asrary was taken into custody Dec. 18 near Boston and could face local charges including possession of child pornography, Los Angeles County sheriff's officials said. Asrary could also face multiple charges in California, officials said.

The victim is now 11. She told investigators she was viewing Bieber's Instagram page when she received a message from another user who said he knew the pop star and could arrange a text meeting.

"Excited at the proposition to text with Justin Bieber, the young victim accepted the offer and was directed to set up an account on the social media site KIK," the department said in a news release.

Asrary, 24, then posed as Bieber on KIK and demanded nude photos from the girl and threatened harm if she did not cooperate, officials said.

Believing him to be Bieber, the victim sent nude selfies and videos and then deleted the texts.

In 2016 Asrary contacted the victim again twice and threatened to put the previous photos online if she did not send more, authorities said. The victim told her mother, who contacted police.

Detectives served several search warrants for information from social media sites and were able to identify the suspect as Asrary, of Revere, Massachusetts, according to the statement.

During an interview the suspect confessed to extorting the victim for sexual images and videos and also implicated himself in similar crimes against other young girls throughout the country, officials said.

Police said they found the images on Asrary's cellphone and computer. His bail was set at $20,000.

A message left at a possible number for Asrary was not returned Tuesday.

In addition to the local charges, Asrary could face multiple charges in California, including extortion, manufacturing child pornography and communicating with a minor with the intent to commit a sex act, authorities said.

Investigators concluded Asrary had no actual connection to Bieber, "but simply fabricated the relationship to influence his young victims," the department said.

Sam Moore to sing at Trump inaugural event

Sam Moore of the soul duo Sam and Dave has been added to the list of performers for President-elect Donald Trump's inaugural events.

Moore told The Associated Press on Tuesday that he felt that the criticism leveled at singer Jennifer Holliday, which led to her to back out of the event, was unfair. Several other musicians have also backed away from performing.

The 81-year-old Moore said he wasn't going to be intimidated by critics. He will perform at the Make America Great Again! Welcome Celebration on Thursday. Others expected to play include country stars Lee Greenwood and Toby Keith.

Sam and Dave were known for their performance of Isaac Hayes' "Soul Man."

Sam Moore to sing at Trump inaugural event

Sam Moore of the soul duo Sam and Dave has been added to the list of performers for President-elect Donald Trump's inaugural events.

Moore told The Associated Press on Tuesday that he felt that the criticism leveled at singer Jennifer Holliday, which led to her to back out of the event, was unfair. Several other musicians have also backed away from performing.

The 81-year-old Moore will perform at the Make America Great Again! Welcome Celebration on Thursday. Others expected to play include country stars Lee Greenwood and Toby Keith.

Moore said he initially planned to attend the event at the Lincoln Memorial because he wanted to see Holliday sing, but when she backed out last week, he asked if he could sing in her place.

"I am not going to let them, the left side, intimidate me from doing what I feel is the right thing to do for the country and that (presidential) seal," Moore said in a phone interview Tuesday.

Moore and his late musical partner Dave Prater were hit singers in the late 1960s with Isaac Hayes-penned hits like "Hold On, I'm Comin'" and "Soul Man," which earned them a Grammy award. Prater died in 1988, but Moore continues to perform and record as a solo artist.

Moore, who has performed for five other U.S. presidents, said he doesn't know Trump personally and sometimes he's been surprised by opinions expressed by Trump.

"He's got a big mouth, like me," Moore said. "Whether you agree with him or not, he's going to say what's on his mind."

But he said Trump deserves a chance to prove himself as the next president.

"Give the man a shot," Moore said. "He hasn't even said 'I do' yet. Give him a chance. If you don't like him after four years, then don't vote for him next time."

Artwork depicting Ferguson removed from Capitol display

A student's painting that divided members of Congress for its depiction of Ferguson, Missouri, has been removed from its Capitol Hill display, this time perhaps permanently.

Several Republicans had complained about the painting, which shows a pig in a police uniform aiming a gun at a protester, and even took down the artwork temporarily. The lawmakers argued that the painting violated rules for a national student arts competition by showing subjects of contemporary political controversy or of a sensationalistic or gruesome nature.

In August 2014, a white police officer shot and killed Michael Brown, an unarmed black teenager, in Ferguson, setting off weeks of protests.

Architect of the Capitol Stephen Ayers informed lawmakers late Friday that the painting would be removed. On Tuesday, with House lawmakers back home for the week, the painting was gone.

The painting was among hundreds completed by high school students that are featured in a tunnel leading to the Capitol and had been hanging for months. But some conservative media outlets called for its removal and Republican lawmakers repeatedly took it down and returned it to Rep. William Lacy Clay's office. Clay put it back up, saying its removal violated a constituent's First Amendment rights to freedom of expression.

That constituent, David Pulphus, co-wrote a column with Etefia Umana, published in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch that said they surely would have been arrested if they had dared to enter the Capitol and removed the statue of slavery advocate John C. Calhoun, a vice president and senator from South Carolina who served before the Civil War.

Umana and Pulphus wrote that anger toward the painting was misplaced and fails to address critical issues pertinent to conditions in African-American communities.

"Art imitates life, but no critic has asked the fundamental question the painting begs: Why would a young student with hope, promise and purpose perceive our community and the police in such a manner?" the pair wrote.

The column concluded with: "David's only comment is, 'The art speaks for itself.' It has spoken loudly. Now, who will protect American civilization, including our Constitution and democracy?"

Clay called the decision arbitrary and insulting. He said the painting would have a "place of honor in my Capitol Hill office."

"This is now about something much bigger than a student's painting. It is about defending our fundamental First Amendment freedoms which include the right to free expression; even when that creativity is considered objectionable by some, and applauded by others," said Clay, who promised to seek a quick reversal of the decision.

Ayers wrote a letter to Clay saying that he consulted with industry experts and reviewed the painting itself before determining that it didn't comply with the House Office Building Commission's prohibitions for the Congressional Arts Competition.

Rep. David Reichert, R-Wash., said the painting hung in clear defiance of rules established for the arts competition and was a slap in the face to law enforcement officers. His letter to the architect of the Capitol initiated the painting's removal.

Artwork depicting Ferguson removed from Capitol display

A student's painting that divided members of Congress for its depiction of Ferguson, Missouri, has been removed from its Capitol Hill display, this time perhaps permanently.

Several Republicans had complained about the painting, which shows a pig in a police uniform aiming a gun at a protester, and even took down the artwork temporarily. The lawmakers argued that the painting violated rules for a national student arts competition by showing subjects of contemporary political controversy or of a sensationalistic or gruesome nature.

In August 2014, a white police officer shot and killed Michael Brown, an unarmed black teenager, in Ferguson, setting off weeks of protests.

Architect of the Capitol Stephen Ayers informed lawmakers late Friday that the painting would be removed. On Tuesday, with House lawmakers back home for the week, the painting was gone.

The painting was among hundreds completed by high school students that are featured in a tunnel leading to the Capitol and had been hanging for months. But some conservative media outlets called for its removal and Republican lawmakers repeatedly took it down and returned it to Rep. William Lacy Clay's office. Clay put it back up, saying its removal violated a constituent's First Amendment rights to freedom of expression.

That constituent, David Pulphus, co-wrote a column with Etefia Umana, published in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch that said they surely would have been arrested if they had dared to enter the Capitol and removed the statue of slavery advocate John C. Calhoun, a vice president and senator from South Carolina who served before the Civil War.

Umana and Pulphus wrote that anger toward the painting was misplaced and fails to address critical issues pertinent to conditions in African-American communities.

"Art imitates life, but no critic has asked the fundamental question the painting begs: Why would a young student with hope, promise and purpose perceive our community and the police in such a manner?" the pair wrote.

The column concluded with: "David's only comment is, 'The art speaks for itself.' It has spoken loudly. Now, who will protect American civilization, including our Constitution and democracy?"

Clay called the decision arbitrary and insulting. He said the painting would have a "place of honor in my Capitol Hill office."

"This is now about something much bigger than a student's painting. It is about defending our fundamental First Amendment freedoms which include the right to free expression; even when that creativity is considered objectionable by some, and applauded by others," said Clay, who promised to seek a quick reversal of the decision.

Ayers wrote a letter to Clay saying that he consulted with industry experts and reviewed the painting itself before determining that it didn't comply with the House Office Building Commission's prohibitions for the Congressional Arts Competition.

Rep. David Reichert, R-Wash., said the painting hung in clear defiance of rules established for the arts competition and was a slap in the face to law enforcement officers. His letter to the architect of the Capitol initiated the painting's removal.

Streep, Meyers, 'Moonlight' to be honored at LGBTQ gala

Actress Meryl Streep, TV host Seth Meyers, and the Golden Globe-winning movie "Moonlight" will be honored next month by the Human Rights Campaign, the LGBTQ civil rights organization.

The award for "Moonlight," a coming-of-age film about a black gay youth, will be accepted by Tarell Alvin McCraney, the author of the play on which the film is based.

Meyers, the host of "Late Night with Seth Meyers" on NBC, is being honored at the Feb. 11 gala for raising awareness about LGBTQ issues, including drawing attention to discriminatory legislation.

Streep, who gave an impassioned speech at the Golden Globes criticizing President-elect Donald Trump for mocking a disabled reporter and calling for the defense of a free press, will be honored for a career of advocating for LGBTQ equality.

Fans celebrate Betty White on actress' 95th birthday

The actress is celebrating her birthday Tuesday. She tells Yahoo's Katie Couric that she's "most grateful" for still getting job offers. She says she appreciates "the fact that people have been so kind to me all these years."

Following a series of high-profile celebrity deaths in 2016, one fan started a tongue-in-cheek fundraiser to help keep the "Golden Girls" star safe until 2017. White says fans "spoil me rotten" and adds that she enjoys "every minute of it."

White was a trending topic on social media Tuesday thanks to well-wishes from fans.

200 items
Results 1 - 10 of 200 next >